The Movement Dance Studio starts new Mommy & Me class on Feb. 2

the movement dance studio

Hooray for starting out SMALL! The Movement Dance Studio, one of our new sponsors here at nwaMotherlode, has opened a new “mommy & me” class for ages 2-3 and you and your tiny dancer are invited to join the first class on Feb. 2nd! If you’ve been considering having your little one start dance class, this is a great opportunity.

The class is called Move with Me and is the perfect way for a parent/caregiver and child to get acquainted with dance. There’s no pressure of an end-of-year recital, just dancing and fun.

To sign up for the new class, call the studio at 479-313-3457  or message them on Facebook here.

We asked one of the teachers, Rebecca Mala, about this class and some of the others offered at The Movement Dance Studio:

rebecca, movement danceIn addition to the Move with Me class, do you also offer other classes for younger kids?

Yes, we also offer ballet and tap classes for 2-3 year olds, 3-4 year olds and 4-6 year olds.

What can moms expect from the Move with Me class?

Moms, dads or any caregiver can expect to come move and dance with their little one (ages 2-3 years old). This class is designed for the young dancer who isn’t quite ready to be in a class on their own! We will work on stretching and basic dance steps and will use fun props like teddy bears, butterfly wings, hula hoops and so much more to help teach coordination, musicality, rhythm and Movement!

Why did you want to start a class for the “littles”?

We love having the Littles at our studio! Not only do they add great energy to the studio, but we feel that encouraging young kids to dance is so important! Dance is a wonderful way to spark creativity and also enhance focus, concentration and discipline. Dance also helps to develop great social and communication skills with other kids!

make your pointeYou also have classes for older preschoolers and older kids, too, right?

We do! We offer great combo classes that will teach kids fundamentals of ballet and tap. We have jazz dance, turns and leaps classes and hip hop classes. We now also offer an all-boys hip hop class that we are super excited about! AND If there are any dancers that only want ballet, we have a fantastic ballet program, called Movement Ballet Theatre that includes pre-ballet classes for ages 8-10 years and also beginner, intermediate and advanced level classes for ages 11-up.

Tell us about the dance options for adults. Do you have classes for grow-ups who don’t have dance/ballet experience?

We have a Monday morning Beginning Adult class from 10:30-11:30- no experience needed! We work at the ballet barre, stretch and even do some across the floor work.

What do you love about teaching at the Movement studio?

I adore teaching at this studio because the staff and families are all supportive and caring. It’s a very positive atmosphere and they really encourage all dancers to not just learn steps and movement but to all work together to discover and explore the pure JOY of dance!

What would you tell parents who are considering dance classes for their kids?

Putting your child in a dance class is one of the best things you can do to help boost a child’s self-esteem and confidence. Being in a dance class allows each kid to explore their creativity, release energy, and meet new friends!

The Movement Dance Studio is at 7321 West Sunset in Springdale (right across from Har-Ber Meadows). Or visit their website here for more information!

the movement collage

Downtown Runaround coming up at The Jones Center!

the-jones-center-race

The first Springdale Downtown Runaround, a 5K/10K race, is coming up on Oct. 8.

It’s a family-friendly event that includes a 1-mile fun run. And let’s not forget the after party! After victoriously crossing the finish line, you can expect refreshments, music, raffle prizes, games, inflatables, and more.

While running, you’ll get to see best of downtown Springdale — the Razorback Greenway trail, Shiloh Square, local businesses, and The Jones Center.

  • When: Saturday, October 8, 2016 8:30 a.m.
  • Where: The Jones Center South Lawn
  • Start Times: 1 Mile Family Fun Run- 8:30AM
  • 5K/10K- 9 a.m.

*Strollers and dogs on a leash are also welcome to join.

downtown_runaroundAll race entries include an official 2016 Springdale Downtown Runaround T-shirt and swag bag filled with goodies. 5K and 10K entries include chip timing and course support. The overall male and overall female winner for the 5K and 10K will receive a medal and prize. The 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place age group winners for the 5K and 10K will be awarded a Springdale Downtown Runaround medal.

Race entry prices increase $5 on Saturday (Sept. 24), so get signed up! CLICK HERE to register for the race or fun run.

The race starts at the South lawn of The Jones Center. Runners will go across Emma Avenue and connect onto the Arkansas Greenway heading south. The competitors will eventually cut back to downtown Springdale and finish running down historic Emma Avenue back to The Jones Center. The 1 mile family fun run will take place along the track located around The Jones Center.

Click here for more info on the Downtown Runaround!

Marathon Mama: Top 10 list of etiquette rules for race day

hogeye starting line

By Beth Gallini, marathoning mama of 2

It’s here – race week for runners participating in any of the Hogeye Marathon races!

There can be a lot of assumed knowledge at races and that can be intimidating to newer runners. Much of this knowledge can be learned with experience, but it can be hard to navigate what to do and what not to do on race day and even harder to understand the reason why for beginner runners.

Here’s a top 10 list of  “rules” for race day:

1. Run in your corral: Corrals are arranged with faster runners starting first and slower runners starting later. By starting with runners who are running a similar pace as you, it reduces the amount of weaving and creates a smoother start when the crowds are at a peak.

2. Run with your bib: If you run with someone else’s bib, you could risk altering rankings and awards. Additionally, there is also no record of your information if you need medical attention.

3. Register for the race: Race directors need to supply traffic controls, medical staff, food, water, snacks, and medals for the number of registered runners. They also cap races based on how many runners the course can accommodate. Banditing a race by showing up to the start line without registering takes supplies and resources away from runners who registered.

4. Be careful when you stop: It is fine to stop to take walk breaks or to stop and walk through aid stations, just be aware of who is around you when you do! Try to make your way to the side of the road before stopping to walk and take a peek behind you to make sure you don’t have someone right on your tail.

hogeye loot5. Be mindful of your trash: Volunteers have to pick up all of the trash leftover on the race course. You do not need to stop to throw fuel wrappers or water cups away, but try to make an effort to at least aim for the trash can.

6. Avoid running in groups: Running with a friend can make a race more enjoyable or someone might be helping to pace you, just be aware of the size of your pack because other runners may have a difficult time getting around you. A good rule of thumb is not to run with more than two people side-to-side.

7. Keep moving at the finish line: While you will be ready to stop running when you cross the finish line, be sure to keep moving forward so you don’t clog the finish chute.

8. Wait to wear your race shirt: You should absolutely take pride in wearing your race shirt, but you might want to think twice before wearing it on race day. First, many runners consider it bad luck because you haven’t actually crossed the finish line yet and you should wait to celebrate once you complete the race. Another reason not to wear it is because it is best to stick with gear you have tested out in training. 

Wearing something new on race day could backfire if it ends up not fitting properly or it causes chafing.

9. Thank the volunteers: Volunteers are giving their time to make it possible for you to race…don’t forget to acknowledge them!

10. Have fun and take pride in your accomplishment: Regardless of how your race goes, remember that you accomplished something big and be proud.

Good luck to all of the runners coming out this weekend and thank you to all of the volunteers who make this even possible!

Beth Gallini, Marathon MamaAbout Beth: Beth is a mom, runner, RRCA certified running coach, and the blogger behind RUNNING around my kitchen.  She and her husband spend their free time chasing their two 2-year-old boys. Beth serves on the board for the Hogeye Marathon and loves helping other moms with their training and answering any questions.  Be social, connect with other Hogeye runners, and let them hear from you by following them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!  #hogeyemarathon

*The Hogeye Marathon is a non-profit organization that gives back to Northwest Arkansas. It’s celebrating its 40th anniversary on April 10th and offers something for everyone with a marathon, half marathon, 5K, 4 person relay, corporate challenge, and volunteer opportunities.

Marathon Mama: How can you protect yourself during a run?

marathon mama protection from injury

By Beth Gallini, marathoning mama of 2

Most runs are fairly uneventful and go as planned.

But what happens when something goes wrong? What happens if something happens to you or someone you are running with?  What can you do to protect yourself?

I used to pay little attention to protecting myself while running and assumed I was healthy and in a safe area. Then:

I learned of attacks that happened on trails I run on. I was with my husband when he got injured mid-run. I had a friend who was attacked during her run. I also now have a family who depend on me. Needless to say, it has become much more important to me to take the necessary precautions to protect myself before I go for a run and while I’m out on the trails.   

Here are things you can do to protect yourself during a run:

See your doctor: My doctors know I run, I get regular physicals, and I get my blood levels checked regularly.  Don’t be afraid to ask questions about how your training may be affected by a medication or a procedure and be sure to let your doctor know if something doesn’t feel right.

alarmCarry an alarm: I run with a small personal alarm that fits inside a pocket.   It makes me feel so much more comfortable running by myself, especially when it’s early in the morning or when the trails are empty.

Carry your phone: I know it sounds like a lot to carry, but it is worth it in the event of an emergency.  I put my phone in a running belt that I wear around my waist and I don’t even feel it when I’m running.  An added bonus is that I also always have access to all of my music, podcasts, and audiobooks!

Carry ID: Even if you have your phone with you, it is important to have identification in case someone needs to help you.  Road ID makes custom identification plates that you can attach to your shoe or wear around your wrist, ankle, or neck.  In addition to your information, you can include the number for a contact to be called in the case of an emergency.

Have someone track you: Garmin’s “Live Track” feature and the Road ID app allow others to track you in real time.  The Road ID app will also send a message if you don’t move for a period of time.

I know this might sound like a lot of extra work, but each of these things allow you to continue doing what you love while helping to keep you safe and healthy!

Beth Gallini, Marathon MamaAbout Beth: Beth is a mom, runner, RRCA certified running coach, and the blogger behind RUNNING around my kitchen.  She and her husband spend their free time chasing their two 2-year-old boys. Beth serves on the board for the Hogeye Marathon and loves helping other moms with their training and answering any questions.  Be social, connect with other Hogeye runners, and let them hear from you by following them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!  #hogeyemarathon

*The Hogeye Marathon is a non-profit organization that gives back to Northwest Arkansas. It’s celebrating its 40th anniversary on April 10th and offers something for everyone with a marathon, half marathon, 5K, 4 person relay, corporate challenge, and volunteer opportunities.

Marathon Mama: The aha moment & how to improve your running

Runner girl

By Beth Gallini

I was recently talking with a friend who completed her first 5K last fall.  She had never run before and her goal leading up to the race was simply to finish.  She didn’t care about her time or pace and didn’t pay any attention to her husband’s talk about trying to finish in a certain time or wondering if they could run faster.

Then she crossed the finish line and she immediately had an “ah-ha moment.” She told me that she “got it.”  She suddenly understood why runners want to keep running races, what draws them back, and why they want to beat a previous time and continue to improve.  She was already thinking about what she could do differently to run a better race next time.

For any runner running a first race or running a new distance for the first time, having a goal to finish is great!

But once you have a little experience under your belt, there are some things you can do to help make you a better and stronger runner:

Strides: Strides are an important part of training for runners of all levels.  They help your body get used to running faster, loosen up any tightness, improve form, and increase your efficiency as a runner.  Strides can be added to the end of an easy run a few times a week and only take a few minutes to perform.  Find a flat stretch at the end of your run and run for approximately 20-30 seconds at roughly 90-95% of maximum effort.  Jog back to your starting point slowly and be sure you are totally recovered before starting the next stride.  Repeat 4-6 times.

Speed work: Speed work can mean very different things and can include a range of different workouts.  Below are some good ways for runners of all levels to include some speed work in their training.

  • Fartleks runs – A fartlek run is a form of “speed play” with surges of speed thrown in during otherwise easy running. It is unstructured and the surges can be a few minutes, the duration of a song on your playlist, until five white cars pass you, the length of three street lights, or anything else you can think of to mark the time.   A fartlek run could look like 1 mile easy, 6 x 2 minute surges with 2 minutes to recover, 1 mile easy.
  • Progression runs – A progression run simply means you run progressively faster during your run.  You could run the first mile easy and slowly increase the effort or pace for each mile until the end.
  • Tempo runs – Tempo runs are run faster than an easy run and at a pace that could be sustained for about 60 minutes or somewhere between your 10K and half marathon pace.  A tempo run might look like 1 mile easy, 2 miles at tempo pace, 1 mile easy.  You could also do intervals, which could look like 1 mile easy, 3 x 1 mile at tempo pace with 2 minutes recovery, 1 mile easy.
  • Long runs — Your long run is simply your longest run of the week and the length will vary depending on what you are training for and how long you have been running.   Regardless of your experience level or your training goals, it is good to have one run a week that is longer than your other runs.

Maintain consistency: It is not uncommon to see a runner train regularly for a race, stop running for a few months once the race is over, and then pick it back up again when they want to run another race.  I firmly believe one of the biggest ways to make big leaps as a runner and to see progress is to be consistent!  This doesn’t mean you don’t take a recovery period or include cut-back weeks, but it does mean that you continue to run on a regular basis.

Non-running things: There are a lot of things we do outside of running that can positively or negatively impact our running.  When we want to improve as a runner, it is important to look at the big picture.

  • Strength training – Doing even a small amount of strength training on a weekly basis will decrease your risk of injury, improve your running form, and help you be a stronger runner. In addition to your legs and upper body, it is important to include exercises that target your core and hip strength.
  • Rest days – It is important to give your body a day to rest and recover!
  • Sleep – Getting enough sleep is important in order for you to have the energy to train and it helps your body to properly recover.
  • Nutrition – Just because you are a runner doesn’t mean you get a free pass to eat anything you want!  It doesn’t mean you can’t have a treat, but you want to keep things in moderation and you want to make sure you eat well so your body is properly fueled for your runs.

Beth Gallini, Marathon MamaAbout Beth: Beth is a mom, runner, RRCA certified running coach, and the blogger behind RUNNING around my kitchen.  She and her husband spend their free time chasing their two 2-year-old boys. Beth serves on the board for the Hogeye Marathon and loves helping other moms with their training and answering any questions.  Be social, connect with other Hogeye runners, and let them hear from you by following them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!  #hogeyemarathon

*The Hogeye Marathon is a non-profit organization that gives back to Northwest Arkansas. It’s celebrating its 40th anniversary on April 10th and offers something for everyone with a marathon, half marathon, 5K, 4 person relay, corporate challenge, and volunteer opportunities.